Usually when child support orders are placed, they concern the finances of two people living in the same state. However, if you live in the state of Florida and the other parent lives in another state, the situation can become a little more complex.

If you are a parent in the state of Florida and you want to either pay child support to the custodial parent who lives out of state, or you want to receive child support from the noncustodial parent who lives out of state, it is important that you understand how the law works so that you can take appropriate action.

Understanding how child support law works

Thankfully for parents that live in separate states, the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act was introduced in 1992. This means that standards are set nationally in regard to child support, and therefore, payment can technically be enforced across states.

However, child support laws do continue to differ between states. Therefore, the law requires that in any child custody case, one state’s law becomes the controlling order, and the other state concerned should work to enforce the law as it is written in the other state.

For example, if there is a child custody order put in place in Florida and the parent that owes child support is residing in Texas, the state of Texas has the responsibility to enforce Florida’s order once it is filed with their courts.

If you want to pay or enforce a child support order that concerns more than one state, it is a good idea to learn more about taking action.